CPI helps build world's largest radio telescope | CPI

CPI helps build world’s largest radio telescope

CPI is reaching for the stars with help to build the world’s largest radio telescope.

The Challenge

Design a prototype advanced instrumentation platform capable of processing the colossal data bank, known as a Mid-Frequency Aperture Array (MFAA) to support the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project alongside the University of Malta and Printed Electronics Limited.

The Outcome

The university designed a prototype advanced instrumentation platform capable of processing the colossal data bank, known as a Mid-Frequency Aperture Array (MFAA).

Making and rolling out printed electronics needed for MFAA sheets, CPI delivered an antenna array to the university, which was used to build a 100sq metre prototype.

The programme will use ten million radio antennae, spread across the deserts of Australia, South Africa, Botswana and seven other African countries, to collect information on map the universe, chart the effects of spacetime and search for extra-terrestrial life.

CPI helped the university design a prototype advanced instrumentation platform capable of processing the colossal data bank, known as a Mid-Frequency Aperture Array (MFAA).

Making and rolling out printed electronics needed for MFAA sheets, CPI delivered an antenna array to the university, which was used to build a 100sq metre prototype.

Successfully reading electromagnetic performance of tightly coupled dense arrays, the unit also calculated complex simulations needed to send information for analysis.

CPI has extensive experiences in the development and scale up of printed electronics based applications”, said Steven Bagshaw, business development manager.“We can help companies move from lab scale processing right through to pre manufacturing volumes, and our core expertise relies in the field of printable electronics.”

The technology offers a key solution for further scale up to mass volumes.”

Mr Bagshaw said the next step in the process is to present the high-grade garden telescope to the SKA organisation as a candidate antenna for the MFAA.

He added: We are proud to have been involved in such a monumental, global project.”

Thanks to our infrastructure in printed electronics, we were able to successfully and productively collaborate with PEL and the University of Malta and help this ground-breaking endeavour move one step closer to the stars.”

The SKA project consists of a core consortium of ten countries.

Further support from more than 100 institutions from another 20 countries will help build the telescope over the next seven years.